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Lithofiel IV 
2022 | 30µm | mixedmedia | ︎ ︎ scroll down



Here, on the Lithosphere, where the earth meets the sky, there exists a long history of how rocks and stones can be seen as images and can be read as texts. A multitude of worlds has been interpreted though surfaces of stones as they depict worlds.
Imaginary or not, they reflect historical events – a vertiginous array of scales, landscapes. But they also include abstract forms and lines that offer geological points of origin for questions, including those of art and aesthetics. From the poetics of stones to the geological, we are nowadays more likely to count, classify, and catalogue than romanticise: geological surfaces and stratifications are measured and mapped such as in the cartographic codes for lithographic patterns. From sandy and silty dolomite to sandstone and shale, quartzite and granite to igneous rock the surface and subsurface are a slowly-unfolding inscription of different minerals.

Stones and rocks are everywhere, and everywhere they mark a place and a time. Not necessarily a moment, as in, historical time, but a site in its duration. And enduring environmental record. To casual observers, as objects, rocks may seem anonymous and interchangeable, but what makes them unique is their exceptionally high viscosity, and from this, their capacity to record deep long histories. Entirely concrete, they contain an excess of potential abstraction.

Following Michel Serres, “it is worth telling the story of a small, local, singular element, that of an atom, a grain of sand” – a rock – “a thin layer of fluid somewhere in the middle of this violent zone where various flows intermingle.”



Stones are remarkably versatile and as such at the base of the continuum of nature to culture. Entirely artificial as past of the millions of years of forming and weathering, they are formative of architectures before architects, and according to many, art before artists. Crack open a rock, and the patterns revealed are both aesthetic and epistemic. As Serres writes, referring to Jules Vernes, rocks and minerals are also a reminder that visual culture does not necessarily start only with the sun and light, the heavens above, but in the darkness of caves and inside rocks