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HorrorFakkel (TerrorFlare)
2022 | 54 x 54cm | mixedmedia | ︎ ︎ scroll down

In the past, whenever I was asked to characterize the gist of my work, I often referred to the notion of uncertainty in the natural universe. Since the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope I have returned to this notion, or rather "state" in which we find ourselves, and towards which the world is inevitably moving. To be more precise; a recognition that we inhabit mobile terrain. That the earth, the actual ground on which we stand is in fact a bundle of pyroclastic stuff going through all kinds of unpredictable chymical transformations. Which to me is both horrific as it is strangely reassuring. 


A Catastrophe of Physics
After my initial excitement on Webb’s* mission specifications, my thoughts lingered towards a more solemn understanding of these and other deep space studies. More detailed surveys of planetary systems for instance, provide accurate insights into our understanding of the natural universe, but will also reveal how planetary bodies might evolve over time. And that includes examples of planets - very similar to ours - that have endured events of catastrophic proportions. Thus, Webb not only points to our shared fascination for the unknown, but it also reminds us that we could potentially be presented with ruthless examples of the temporality of worlds. What this asks for - at least in my humble opinion - is a dwelling on vulnerability and indeterminacy of worlds. Not by getting carried away by grandiose stories about the end of it, but by developing an eye for the state in which our world has always existed : a state of precarity.


https://www.jwst.nasa.gov/ the James Webb Space Telescope is the world’s largest, most powerful and most complex space science telescope evr built. In time Webb will send us observations made of the early universe, formations of galxies, star lifecycles and protoplanetary systems

 
Mark